To Your Health
November 8, 2001

from John F Thie DC

This version of
To Your Health
is an occasional newsletter edited by the California Chiropractic Association with comments from
John F. Thie, DC

Dear friends, we have had a very serious computer crash. We thought we had everything backed up, but no luck. So we have to build another list. As of November 2001, we are working on several projects, which we hope will get us back up and running with our Newsletter, but for the time being we no longer have our mailing list and so we won't be sending any more letters until we get that sorted out!

 

In This Issue:

computer crash

Don't Take Antibiotics for That Sore Throat!

Considering Elective Surgery?

Don't Take Antibiotics for That Sore Throat!

Approximately three-quarters of adults who visit a primary care physician because of a sore throat are given an antibiotic, according to a recent study. Antibiotics can be effective at killing certain bacteria. Almost all sore throats are caused by viruses, however, which are untreatable with antibiotics. The most common bacterial cause of sore throats is a germ present in only five to 17% of adults annually. The authors of a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association examined data from over 2,200 sore-throat patient visits in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) from 1989 to 1999. They calculated rates of prescriptions for patients with sore throats, as well as the different antibiotics prescribed by physicians. The results showed that when antibiotics were prescribed, they were frequently unnecessary, and often the wrong ones. The recommended antibiotics were only prescribed in one-quarter of all visits. The use of recommended (correct) antibiotics also decreased, from 32% of cases in 1989 to 11% in 1999.

There are two main concerns for the overuse of antibiotics: unnecessary monetary costs and the development of a bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The more resistant bacteria become to antibiotics, the less effective these antibiotics will be when you truly need them. The next time you have a sore throat, consider home remedies like chicken soup, extra vitamin C, and lots of rest and fluids - especially water instead of antibiotics.

Reference: Linder JA, Stafford RS. Antibiotic treatment of adults with sore throat by community primary care physicians: A national survey, 1989-1999. Journal of the American Medical Association, September 12, 2001:286(10), pp. 1181-1186.

 

Return to top ^

Dr. Thie's Comment:

Recently there has been a lot of concern about the dangers of anthrax and the need for antibiotics against anthrax and other microbes. Actually, you are much more likely to win the main prize of the lottery if you buy a ticket, than to contract any of the deseases that are scaring people today. But people do win the lottery every day, so we might consider what is best to do for ourselves in case of that slim chance.

Getting your energy in harmony with your goals will also increase your natural resistance. I take a regular supplement of vitamin C to keep my immune system up. If I feel like I'm coming down with something, I find larger than expected amounts of Vitamin C very helpful. I usually find that about 6 times my normal supplemental dosage can make a big difference over night.

 

 

Return to top ^

Touch for Health® is a registered trademark. All rights reserved.
Dr. John F. Thie 6162 La Gloria Dr. Malibu, California 90265 USA

Considering Elective Surgery?

Weigh the Risks If you are considering surgery. Information regarding the risks involved is important for you to be able to make the right decision. Elderly people in particular need to know what risks they face going into an elective surgical procedure, because they are at a much greater risk of accidental death.

A recent study in Effective Clinical Practice assessed the death rates for 14 types (six cardiovascular, eight cancer-related) of elective, high-risk surgeries in 1.2 million patients 65 and older. Deaths were also examined related to the age of the patient and the procedure performed. In older patients, the risk of operative death was "frequently" higher than 10%, which is much higher than typically reported in trial studies. Risk of death substantially increased with age in most cases; operative death for patients 80 years or older was more than double that of patients ages 65 to 69. Also, mortality differed significantly between procedures: heart valve replacement and partial lung or esophagus removal (because of cancer) were the most dangerous procedures (over 15% operative mortality rate in patients older than 80). Age is probably the most important predictor of operative mortality. Think twice before going under the knife if you are past middle age, even if it initially appears to be your only option.Talk to your Complementary, Alternative Medicine practitioner about preventing senior health problems.

Reference: Finlayson EVA, Birkmeyer JD. Operative mortality with elective surgery in older adults. Effective Clinical Practice, July/August 2001:4(4), pp. 172-177.

Dr. Thie's Comment:

There are many different goals for seniors related to diseases that occur much more frequently as we all age. You need to ask yourself and the practitioner, what problems will be eliminated by the procedure I am undertaking? What are the risks? Sometimes you don't think about what it is that you want better in your life. A practitioner says you have a disease and the assumption is that it is necessary to eliminate the disease or condition. Perhaps the only known treatment surgery, therefore you must have surgery. It is a very honest opinion, but it might not consider your priorities for what you want for the rest of life, however long or short that might be.

If you only have a saw then everything needs to be shortened. If you only have a hammer, everything needs to but pounded. Getting a second and third opinion from someone that doesn't use the same health/disease care model can help you get perspective and allow you to decide if the treatment may be worse than the disease considering the after effects, dangers from the actual operation and side effects.

You are not showing disrespect for the practitioner, but respect for the fact that the practitioner is a human being who isn't perfect, and might not know everything. Getting a TFH energy balance for the goal of right decision can help you be in harmony with tough decisions that will effect others in your family as well as yourself.